OpenICM Lite we accept Visa, MasterCard, and American Express credit and debit cards for your convenience. For all other OpenICM versions the delivery will be invoiced according to agreed payment schedule.  

For OpenICM Lite, once payment is confirmed your version of OpenICM will be available. All other implementations of OpenICM depend on the scale of the implementation.

SaaS is a method of software delivery that allows data to be accessed from any device with an Internet connection and web browser. In this web-based model, software vendors host and maintain the servers, databases and code that constitute an application. This is a significant departure from the on-premise software delivery model. First, companies don’t have to invest in extensive hardware to host the software, and this in turn, allows buyers to outsource most of the IT responsibilities typically required to troubleshoot and maintain the software. The SaaS vendor takes care of it all.

The first step to answering this question is to determine the complexity of your business. We typically recommend SaaS to small to medium businesses with fairly straight forward business processes that are looking to reduce upfront expenses. Why? SaaS solutions are cost effective, but they are still working their way toward handling the complex requirements of large enterprise businesses. If there is one area that SaaS is still working to make up ground in terms of offerings, it’s delivering the same level of robust functionality that you find in on-premise systems.

(source : Manoj Chandra Jha)

This is a legitimate concern as in the world of software, vendors come and go all the time – whether through industry consolidation or business failure. The data, however, is typically yours to keep. Your data is mirror to your own servers or can be mirror to an Escrow server. The Escrow service “keeps the lights on” even if we cannot fulfil our obligations. This prepaid service is meant to safeguard our customers to ensure your data is accessible in the event something should happen with the vendor. In any case our software is build as such that you can alsways download you data is structured and readable format such as excel or xml.

The primary downside of SaaS is that it relies on a good Internet connection. You’ll know better than anyone how this will affect you. How’s your Internet? While many believe on-premise systems to be more reliable, no system is fully immune to downtime. On-premise software is subject to electrical outages, hardware failures and a range of other risks.

As a safeguard our solution for the major part also works "offline" that allows people to keep working in the event that Internet does go down. Once a solid connection is available again, all the data is synced to the system.

It isn’t just semantics. The cloud refers to a set of incredibly complex infrastructure technology. At a fundamental level, it’s a collection of computers, servers, and databases that are connected together in a way that users can lease access to share their combined power. The computing power is scalable so that buyers can dynamically increase, or decrease, the amount of computing power they lease.

 

The cloud can refer to anything that’s hosted remotely and delivered via the Internet. While all cloud programs are run by underlying software, SaaS refers specifically to business software applications that are delivered via the cloud. Given the widespread growth of cloud accessibility, it’s been easier, faster and less expensive for SaaS developers to roll out applications as compared to traditional on-premise software development. Today, nearly every type of core business function – from human resources to enterprise resource planning – is available via SaaS.

 

(source : Manoj Chandra Jha)

A private cloud takes all of the infrastructure technology that runs a public cloud and stores it on-premise. Users achieve the same functionality and ability to access their data through a web browser. However, instead of sharing the computing power with the general public, the computing power is shared among users at one company. Contrary to the public cloud model, a private cloud requires an IT department to perform maintenance and upkeep.

 

A private cloud is really only a viable option for large enterprises that can invest in the infrastructure required to develop and maintain a cloud environment. With private clouds, it takes a large scale to generate a return on investment from this level of technology purchase. For large enterprises that don’t want to put their information in a publicly accessed cloud, it is an attractive option.

This is one of the biggest sticking points for companies that are considering SaaS. Security is an important consideration when allowing someone else to maintain your business-critical data, especially for companies with large data sets. However, with online banking and online payroll systems becoming the norm today, the security issue seems to be a bit of a red herring. Few things are more important than our bank accounts, yet most of us are comfortable with putting this information in the cloud.

 

In truth, data security is independent of whether the server is sitting right next to you or in a different city. Apples to apples, SaaS vendors are actually able to invest much more in security, backups and maintenance than any small to medium enterprise. For this reason, a web-based system typically has more security measures in place than an on-premise system. Furthermore, most SaaS vendors undergo stringent security procedures of SAS70 Type II audits that test the data center’s level of security. And chances are an individual IT department within may not hold themselves to the same standards.